Feminism is NOT created equal

Feminism_Small.003

fem·i·nism

ˈfeməˌnizəm/
noun

 1. the advocacy of women’s rights on the grounds of political, social, and economic equality to men, the women’s movement, the feminist movement, women’s liberation, female emancipation, women’s rights.


Evidently, feminism isn’t created equal. I mean the definition is clear, cut and simple, equal rights for women. I’m not a rocket scientist but I would assume that includes ALL women, white women, black women, latino women, asian women, and transgender women, you know women.  Well according to statistics (wage statistics show white women, earn more than all “other” women) and “white” feminism I’m sadly mistaken, it’s extremely hard to discuss such a sensitive topic without getting emotional, so I’ll try my best.

I’m fully aware that the ignorance of the minority should never be associated with the majority, now I don’t want to believe that all white women whom hold the designation of feminist share the views of the minority, who’s views on feminism practices the exclusion of women of color and trans-women. Like really? WTF! Why is this even an idea? Who is in charge of coming up with such an idiotic concept? Oh let’s fight for the rights of women, but only certain women. So white feminism is a thing and is comparable to a racist white girls only club, only in America!How are we as a nation suppose to move past issues like this when people are constantly trying to find ways to separate us instead of working to see the beauty in what makes us exactly the same.

I’m beyond exhausted with the nonsense that ensues with being a black (woman) citizen of the United States of America.

Thank goodness for the young people (Amandla Stenberg, and Rowan Blanchard) for speaking out against this antiquated train of thinking. Makes me feel there is at least hope for the next generation…

T
Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Feminism is NOT created equal

  1. Hooray for the younger generation ^-^! I’m glad to see younger women calling out injustice/double-standards, and sticking up for one another.

    The things you’ve pointed out really hit home with me, in that they remind me of some things I’ve always noticed about my mother. Growing up, people told her that if she didn’t want us to see her as “just some white lady” who didn’t understand us, she should do the following things: learn how to do our hair, spend time with us, fight for our rights, teach us that all women have equal rights, and teach us why women need solidarity. She did none of those things… in fact, she made it quite clear to us that she felt threatened by women of color (and black women especially). She has always been a self-proclaimed feminist (because the ideology benefits her), but she acts as if non-white women have no rights, and talks about black women in particular as if they were all criminals. You can’t tell her that calling women of color (including her own daughters) “N****rs” isn’t exactly helpful to the feminist cause, and doesn’t exactly create solidarity.

    My mother is an extreme example (I would hope), but I have also noticed an air of this sort of sentiment among some of my white female acquaintances… if any black female in the group makes a show of power, or speaks up for herself, they play victim to her blackness, as if she is somehow hurting them. But they can do the same, without stigma. And if any black woman has a problem with what they’ve said, she’s “overreacting”. It’s so frustrating that so many people won’t acknowledge that the game has been rigged.

    1. It is extremely frustrating, I just wish we could just get past these types of issues. It doesn’t benefit us and it makes us horrible, ignorant, intolerable are archaic.

Comments are closed.